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Motivation Waves

When I speak to companies and organizations about my Paralympic journey, one of the questions I’m asked most frequently is some variation of this: “how do you stay motivated through the rigors of training?”

For a long time I answered this question in the same way. I explained how I loved my sport; how training was my favorite part of the day; how I was passionate about both my goals and the process of obtaining them, and how when you’re doing something that you’re truly passionate about, motivation is easy.

I was always astutely aware of the sense of disappointment that settled in the room when I gave this answer. I think people wanted to hear real, tangible things they could do to stay motivated through a new fitness routine or withstand challenges in the workplace, and my abstract, rose-colored response was not very satisfying.

Still, even though I knew it was the answer people didn’t necessarily want to hear, I kept giving it. Because at that point in my career, it sincerely felt like the truth; and if there’s one thing I cannot do, it’s stand up in front of a room and speak anything other than my truth.

Looking back, I know there were times that despite my love for the sport, motivation did not come easily – I simply didn’t have the self-awareness to see it at the time. For years, I believed that in order to be a successful athlete, I needed to be motivated all the time. So strong was this belief that I learned to feign motivation when I didn’t have it. Over time, I got so good at pretending that I was actually able to convince myself that a lack of desire or willingness to train were issues to which I was immune.

I’ve since come to realize that what I thought was immunity was actually denial, and with that came a more nuanced understanding of how motivation works. I now know that motivation ebbs and flows. No matter how much we love what we do, there are going to be days (or weeks or months), where we’re just not feeling it. And that is okay.

I think the very question “how do you stay motivated” reflects our society’s obsession with positive emotions. We feel like we have to be happy at all times, and if we’re not, we need to actively change it (or at least just give the illusion that we are). We believe motivation must be a permanent fixture, and if god forbid we wake up one morning missing that drive, we must embark on a manhunt to find it (or at least just fake it ‘til we make it).

Not only is sadness—or anger or fear or any other “negative” emotion—okay, it’s necessary. They are central to the human experience, and paradoxically, we simply cannot experience happiness when we deny our ability to feel these more unpleasant emotions. In the same vein, not only are periods of low motivation okay, they are necessary to go through for your long-term sustainability. Show me somebody who is relentlessly motivated 24/7 and I’ll show you somebody who will find themselves on the edge of burnout within the next five years.

It took me years to develop the self-awareness to see what motivation looked like for me, both in its abundance and in its absence. But the real work was—and continues to be—in accepting the fluctuation of motivation as a natural part of the game. That’s not to say that if I’m in a period of low motivation, I’m going to dwell on it. But it’s also not saying that I’m going to force myself out of it, and convince myself that I’m feeling something that I’m not. In almost all cases, simply riding the wave is far more effective than fighting or denying it.

While short phases of low motivation are to be expected, more prolonged periods could be a sign that something needs to change. In instances like this, it’s helpful to zoom out and think about the reasons why you’re dong this thing in the first place. I find that examining the why often lends itself to a resurgence of motivation as I become clearer about my purpose. And if it doesn’t, it’s a hint that I either need to change my why or evaluate whether it’s worth continuing.

Training can be a grind. I used to resist that statement because of that word’s negative connotation and my said desire to only view my training in a positive light. But more recently, I’ve come to be very much inspired by the idea of the grind. About showing up when you’re tired and uninspired. About putting in the work when not a single fiber in you wants to be there. About coming back day after day, even when the process is beating you to the ground. After a long winter of waning motivation, I really started to embrace this idea of the grind. I found that showing up and nailing my sessions – regardless of how I felt on that day – was really empowering. It made me feel like a badass. And that feeling of fulfillment ended up being motivating in itself.

So what’s the real key to staying motivated—or more accurately, to continuing on when you find yourself in an inevitable period of low motivation?

Simple. Show up anyway.

I’m not sure if this answer is much better than my previous one. This too is not an easy fix that people want to hear. But as unglamorous as it is, this is my truth.

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Farewell, Chicago

I had no idea when I moved to the Chicago area for college in 2009 that I would stick around for as long as I have. And yet here I am, 8 years later, finally saying goodbye to the city that I’ve grown to love so much, that it’s become a part of me.

Most people love Chicago for the nightlife, the Big 4 sports teams, and the fact that you can walk out your door and get food from anywhere in the world in less than 20 minutes. But my reality is that I go to bed before 10 most nights, I find sports games generally boring, and 9 times out of 10 I just go to Antique Taco. So why exactly do I love this city so much? Why did I stay here for nearly a decade, and why am I finding it so difficult to leave?

Simple. It’s the people.

I have created a community of people here that is greater than anything I ever could have dreamed. People who have been by my side through my greatest triumphs and most devastating failures, and who loved me just the same though both. People I could call for a ride when I got a flat tire, who opened up their homes to me when I was between leases, who showed up at my apartment with soup and pedialyte when I had the flu, and with whom I could comfortably have some of life’s toughest conversations. People whose lives I’ve invested in in return, whom I’m genuinely excited to see each day, for whom I would take the red line to Navy Pier at rush hour (the equivalent of walking through fire). Being engaged in their lives has been my greatest joy, and has provided me with a sense of purpose and meaning.

While I started to grow tired of the hustle and bustle of the city as early as two years ago, it was my community that caused me to stay. Even though I knew Chicago was not able to provide the best environment for me to excel professionally, I couldn’t imagine how I could excel if I didn’t have my community. But eventually, the less-than-ideal climate, the never-ending logistics, and the stress of living in a densely populated metropolis finally tipped the scale. So when I saw an opportunity to move to Colorado Springs, I decided to take it.

Leaving my Chicago community in order to advance my athletic career is one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do. The process of saying goodbye to my friends here only validated my belief that these people are some of the greatest souls I will ever know. My friend Kelsea said it best when she said: “Obviously we’re all going to be sad to see you go. But the people who really love you, the people who want what’s best for you — we want you to come back here in three years with a gold medal. And even if you don’t come back with the gold, we want you to come back here knowing that you gave it everything you had. That you left no stone unturned and dedicated yourself 100% to being the best that you could possibly be.”

It’s because of support like this that I am able to go confidently towards this next phase of my journey. As heartbreaking as it is to leave the city that is my home, my friends here have taught me that home is not a physical space. It is not confined to a city or a building. Home is the people who inhabit it. And those people will always be a part of me, no matter how far away I may be. All the memories and experiences that we shared together — those don’t live in Chicago. They live inside of them and they live inside of me.

Chicago will always hold a piece of my heart. From my first garden unit apartment on Southport, to my first “real” job in River North, it’s where I experienced the highs and lows of emerging adulthood. From learning how to run on a blade on the streets surrounding UIC, to completing my first triathlon at 63rd St. Beach, to training for my first Paralympics within the walls of EDGE, it’s where I grew into the athlete I am today. It’s where I began to accept who I really am — including the parts I’m not thrilled about — and where I started to develop into the person I was meant to be. In many ways, it’s where I grew up.

My time in Chicago will always be a part of my life’s journey. And while I don’t know whether or not I’ll come back after 2020, I do know that I will always have a home here.

And so, to my fellow Chicagoans who have made the last 8 years so special: thank you. I don’t think I can ever express just how grateful I am to have been impacted by you.

Onward we go.

The part of being an Olympian that nobody talks about

When most people think of an Olympian, they think of the glory and the glamor. The sculpted muscles and shimmering medals. The inspiring faces of determination, the universal expressions of triumph, the adorable opening ceremony outfits. And the smiles – oh the smiles! I don’t think there’s anything quite like the emotion that’s captured in an Olympian’s smile.

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But there’s another part of being an Olympian that nobody talks about – and that is what happens after the Games. What happens when the flags in Olympic Park come down; when the buzz of returning home dies off; when we go back to “real life” and realize that, for the first time in many years, it is extraordinarily ordinary.

For many Olympians, this next phase is not so glorious. There is a phenomenon called the post-Olympic depression*, and it’s a lot more common than you may think. If you’ve ever reached a lifelong goal, you may be able to relate: when you’ve spent years being 100% invested in one thing and then it’s over, life kind of turns upside-down.

*A note on semantics. While the severity of depression varies among individual athletes, in this context, post-Olympic depression refers to the entire spectrum, from mild depressive episodes to clinical depression.

Post-Olympic depression can take on many different forms.

For the medalist who just experienced the highest high she ever dreamed of, it’s coming back down and wondering how she’s ever going to top that.

For the athlete who fell short of his expectations, it’s questioning every decision he made that led to him missing a once-in-a-lifetime shot.

For the retiring athlete whose entire identity is intertwined with his sport, it’s wondering how he’s now supposed to see himself.

For the athlete who spent four years working towards this thing that she thought would bring her ultimate happiness, it’s realizing that there is still a piece of her that’s not satisfied – that the void she was trying to fill is still there.

I was warned about the post-Olympic depression (I actually came across an Atlantic article about it a few weeks before Rio, but did not allow myself to read it until the Games were over). But you see, I developed a plan to outsmart it: I signed up for a marathon. I poured all of my energy that was once focused on the Paralympics into this new endeavor, thereby distracting myself from the post-Rio emotions that I hadn’t processed. It was a crafty move (if I may say so myself), and for a few months, I was actually able to convince myself that I had evaded the dark period that follows the Games.

But in reality, all I was really doing was prolonging the inevitable. Then two days after the marathon, I woke up drowning in all of the feelings I had been suppressing. I initially thought the emptiness I felt was a result of my disappointing performance at my marathon, but I soon realized that it ran far deeper. I could run away from the post-Olympic depression all I wanted, but in my particular case, it was a reality I would eventually have to face.

I won’t lie – the last six weeks have been really hard. I’ve felt exhausted much of the time, a combination of physical fatigue and mental burnout. I’ve struggled to get excited about the season ahead, and experienced hopelessness when I couldn’t find the motivation to get even the easiest workouts in.  I’ve been overwhelmed and confused thinking about what I want the next four years to look like, and was terrified to realize that I don’t know who I would be if I wasn’t an athlete. There were a few really bad days: days where I was completely despondent and all I wanted to do was stay in bed. But overall, this time has been characterized by more of just a dulled interest in several aspects of my life. But considering these were the aspects that used to be my greatest sources of joy, dulled interest feels like pretty sharp pain.

When I first started to experience the post-Olympic depression, I tried to force myself out of it. However, I’ve learned that in order to work though this, I need to be patient with my emotions and not pressure myself to change the way I feel. The culmination of the Paralympics is very much a loss, and like any loss, it must be grieved. And so I am going to be generous with myself, listen to what my body needs, and not force a motivation that isn’t there. I will reflect on what else I’m looking to get out of my sport, I will ask myself if my heart is still in it, and I will be honest with my answers. I’ve already found that by giving myself permission grieve at my own pace, I’ve started to feel a lot better. And while I can’t say that I am completely out of the woods just yet, I do believe it’s just around the corner.

So why am I talking about this – this thing that nobody talks about? Why would I come out and write publicly about a stigmatized idea that we like to pretend does not exist? I guess it comes down to two reasons: to normalize and to demystify.

To address the normalization reasoning, it’s worth mentioning the other time in my life that I experienced very similar feelings. When I went to college, I really struggled with the transition. I had a difficult time assimilating myself into a group and never really felt like I fit in. I remember breaking into tears at seemingly random moments throughout my first year. I remember being angry so much of the time, but not being able to explain why.

What made that year even harder was the fact that everyone I knew had told me that college was supposed to be the best time of my life. That dichotomy between others’ expectations and my actual experience was one that I started to internalize; if I was the only person who could go to college and not have fun, there had to be something wrong with me. What I didn’t learn until after I graduated is that the emotions that I felt my freshman year are actually incredibly common. Even some of my friends – the same people who I thought were having the time of their lives – later told me that they felt the way I did that first year.

When I think back to my 18-year old self, the one thing that I wished more than anything was to know that I was not the only one who was hurting so much. That feeling – that burning desire to have my experience validated – was very much on my mind when I decided to write this. I want any other athlete who may be struggling with life post Olympics to know that they are not alone.

More generally, I want any person who has experienced depression – regardless of the duration or severity– to know that they are not alone. And even though it’s rarely discussed, it’s something that affects even the strongest people in the world.

Which leads me to my next reason: to demystify. I think a lot of people view Olympians as being superhuman. In order to reach the limits of human potential, we must be immune to the internal struggles that are central to the human experience.

This notion is further perpetuated by the image of Olympians that is portrayed in the media, an image that I am responsible for contributing to in the buildup to Rio. I conformed to the norm of publicizing my highlight reel while conveniently omitting the bloopers, convincing those around me that everything was perfect. I couldn’t let my competitors know that I was on the brink of overtraining or that I had so much anxiety that I wasn’t sleeping, so I hid those facts from the world while choosing to share the things that made me look better. It felt like something I had to do at the time, but I also hated that I couldn’t be honest about my reality.

The thing is, I don’t want people to think that my life is all wonderful all the time. It’s necessary to talk about the hard stuff, in part because struggle lays the groundwork for success, but more importantly because to not talk about it would feed the false belief that Olympians are beyond ordinary.  The truth is that we Olympians are humans – impacted by feelings, susceptible to pain, capable of doubt.

My goal here is not to expose some dirty little secret of my fellow athletes. I am just one person, and I can only speak to my own experience. But for this particular Paralympian, here’s what I can tell you:

I fall down a lot. Sometimes I get back up immediately, and sometimes I’m down for longer than I’d like to let on.

The internal struggles that we all face – the questions of worth, the uncertainty of my life’s purpose, the disparity between how I feel and how I think I should feel – are battles that I fight every day.

I believe that these shared struggles can connect us to each other in ways more beautiful and more profound than the highlight reels can do.

And I think it’s time we start talking about them.

Reflections on Houston Marathon

After Rio, I decided I wanted to take a break from triathlon training and have a little fun.  So naturally, I signed up for a marathon because isn’t that what people do when they want to take a break and have fun?  I ended up choosing Houston Marathon because a group of athletes from Catapult were doing it as well, and I thought it would be a great way to support their cause and be reunited with some of my friends from the Paratri world. When I learned that Houston typically averaged January temps in the 50s (pretty much ideal marathon weather) the deal was sealed.

Though I continued working with Mark through the fall, I brought in Robyn – a coach in Chicago, the owner of EDGE, and a great friend – to do all my run programming.  It was great to get another perspective in my training, and I loved being able to do a lot of my runs with her in person. She also offered to come to Houston to support me pre-race and pace me for part of the race.

Houston ended up going though a bit of a heat spell the week of the race, and forecasts for that Sunday were showing a high around 70 and wicked humidity. I tried not to pay too much attention to the weather, and instead just enjoyed spending time with good people in a pre-race environment that was virtually free of stress (which like, never happens).

I ended up getting a lot nuggets wisdom in the hours leading into the race – wisdom that certainly colored my experience of it. On Saturday, I received a good luck message from my friend/running idol, Jerry.  The note ended with this:

“Do good, don’t let you beat you, and we’ll all be cheering back home.”

I did an immediate double take, scanning backward to re-read that middle fragment.  Surely he meant to say, “don’t let her beat you.”  But when I read it a second time, I realized that Jerry’s use of pronouns was entirely intentional.  What I did not realize, however, is just how much meaning those words would come to take on.

The other great wisdom came from Robyn as we made our way to the start corral on Sunday morning. She told me how she loves racing for the same reason that some people love weddings — it’s a time when people show up as the best version of themselves.  At weddings, you wear your nicest attire, you’re on your best behavior, and for that one day, you put your own stuff aside in order to celebrate two people’s love for one another. And it’s kind of the same on race day.  You reserve your favorite shorts and most comfortable socks, you show up with freshly shaven legs and the best fuel in your body, and for that one day, you check all your insecurities at the door in order to celebrate your love for your sport.

And so I started the race ready to be my best self and ready to face my toughest competitor, yours truly.  I was excited to be there, confident in my preparations, and (in retrospect, perhaps naively) optimistic about the conditions.  I had Stephanie, a Catapult volunteer and guide extraordinaire, at my side from the very start and looked forward to Robyn joining us a few miles in.

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It was 68 degrees with 100% humidity when the race began. Knowing this, we decided to start the race a fair bit slower than my goal pace, with the intent of getting faster as I went along. But I was feeling good and barely noticing the humidity, so I split the difference and settled in to a rhythm just slightly slower than goal pace – which at the time, felt pretty conservative.

It was at mile 6 that I was supposed to start speeding up, but when I got to that point, the opposite started happening. As the numbers on my watch got larger instead of smaller, I started to notice how much I was sweating, how the socket of my prosthetic had already rubbed away the skin on my leg, how fast my heart was beating, how difficult it was to get air into my lungs. That was the moment when I realized just how hard my body had been working in those first few miles. By running at a slightly too aggressive pace, I had dug myself a hole; but because of the humidity, every shovelful was twice the size as it should have been. So by the time I got to 6, that hole was so deep that there was no coming out of it. And let me tell you: to feel that bad, that early on is one of the biggest mental challenges you can face.

The next several miles were a pretty dark time. Robyn jumped in at 8, and instead of being excited for her company, I barely acknowledged her.  The pain that I was feeling was all-consuming, and I felt almost zombie-like. I was trying so hard to stay within the mile that I was in, but all I could think about was how these early miles were not supposed to hurt this much.

Then around the halfway point, I finally told Robyn the thought that had been going through my mind for the last 7 miles.  I told her I felt like I was wasting my fitness.  The message between the lines was that I wanted to stop.  I wanted to pull off right there, call it a training day, and pick a new race in a few weeks — a race where I could actually achieve what I knew I was capable of.

I could tell that she understood my underlying message, but she was not going to entertain it. “You’re not wasting your fitness,” she insisted. “You’re testing it in a way that’s tougher than anything you could have prepared for. The only thing that matters in this moment is that you’re doing your best. But it actually has to be your best.”

She paused.

“And you telling me at mile 13 that you’re ‘wasting your fitness’ is not your best.”

Those words really got to me. In that moment, I was not being the best version of myself. My best self does not dwell on discomfort so much that it debilitates her; she uses the discomfort as fuel to move forward. My best self doesn’t ignore the people around her or roll her eyes at signs of encouragement; she opens herself up to human connection. My best self does not spend a quarter of her race wishing she could quit and choose an easier one; she stays in the present moment, and does everything that she can in that moment to maximize her effort.

I was allowing me to beat me. A version of myself that I don’t really like very much was beating the version of myself that had planned to show up that day. But I realized in that moment that my best self could still make an appearance. I just needed to do something differently.

Empowered by this shift in my mindset, I knew I needed to make a physical change too. So I took off my hydration vest, then realizing how good I felt without it, I stripped my sopping wet shirt as well. Between the loss of weight from shedding the vest and the air that was getting on my skin, it felt like a flip switched.  Suddenly my pace dropped what felt like minutes. My form tightened up. I began to notice the things around me again.  I even started to laugh. I was back.

For the rest of the race, I felt like a different person.  Instead of being consumed by the suffering that I was experiencing, I was working with it. To be clear, I was still very much suffering; but it no longer felt like this indomitable force that clouded the entire experience. Instead, it became one sensation that I was experiencing in addition to a gamut of other feelings. Rather than allowing the pain to hold total power over my race, I acknowledged its existence while making space for feelings like strength, amusement, joy, and pride.

There were some tough miles near the end, but for the most part, I took that second half stronger than the first.  And when I finally crossed the finish line – a full 30 minutes after I originally planned – I was so full of pride.  Because to be as low as I was, and then to turn it around…that is a really beautiful thing.

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Now I’d be lying if I said I’m happy with how things ended up.  In reality, the days after the race were really hard. I was mad at myself for how I paced the first section, mad at the weather for messing up my plan, and mad that I probably wouldn’t have a chance to redeem myself in this distance for a long time.  When you’ve worked so hard for something, it’s disappointing when the result doesn’t reflect the effort that you put in.

But here’s the thing: outcomes aren’t everything. This was a difficult thing to remember, both in the middle of the race and in the days afterward. But the farther removed I get from the race, the more I’m accepting that it is, in fact, the process that matters. And the truth is that the 14-week process of preparing for the marathon was absolutely amazing.  I challenged my fast-twitch dominant body in new ways. I sustained the most volume for the longest period of time than I ever have before. I ran 20 miles on a treadmill. I negative split a 22-miler outside. And through it all, I had so.much.fun. When all’s said and done, the hundreds of miles I ran in training matter much more than the 26 miles I ran on race day, and that incredible training is what I’ll take with me.

But the most important lesson that the Houston Marathon taught me is that my toughest competitor is not another person — it’s myself.  But no matter what feelings I may experience in a race, they only have as much power as I give them.  I always have the choice to bring my best self, and when that choice is made, I reclaim all the power.  I can change the rest of the race.  I can hit rock bottom, and then somehow find what I need to turn it around.

And that is what I’m choosing to take with me.

2016: the year of the process

On Christmas Eve this year, I – being the sentimental lover of organized fun that I am – made my family indulge in a game of 2016 reflections, where we went around the room and shared our highlights of the year.  I was the last one to go, and when we finally got to me, my little sister sarcastically said “Hmm, I wonder what Hailey’s highlight of 2016 was.”

She was referring to Rio, the ostensibly obvious answer.  I mean, that’s what anyone who got to go to the Paralympics/Olympics would respond with, right?  But when I think about the year that I had, the highlight was not actually Rio itself — it was the process of getting there.  It was the lessons I learned, the people I shared it with, and the self growth that I achieved along the way.  Moreover, it was learning how to embrace the process while it was happening.

You know that old cliche: “It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey.”  While I’d seen this quote plastered on many a decorative wall art in the past, I never fully understood its validity until this year.

I started 2016 with a very different mindset.  At that time, I was obsessed with one thing — the goal of winning in Rio.  Consequently, I was going into every workout with this giant (self-imposed) pressure to execute it perfectly.  I was constantly comparing myself to other athletes, and was self-conscious about everything I was doing in my training.  I had a chronic buzz of anxiety that was beginning to consume me.  While I was still excited about the destination of Rio, I was not enjoying the journey.

I’ve always believed that certain people come our lives during times that we need them the most, and that certainly proved to be true in 2016.  When my focus was so narrow that all I could see was the destination, I had people enter my life who forced me to widen my view and embrace the journey.

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My dream team: Mark and Sara

A few months into the new year, I started working with a new triathlon coach, Mark.  A big part of our work together involved reframing my goals from being outcome-focused to process-driven.  This meant that instead of worrying about hitting every pace exactly as it was written (outcome), I focused my attention on task-oriented skills, like maintaining a strong pull on my swim stroke or keeping a quick cadence on the run (process).  Mark really emphasized that strong character is what drives results, so while part of his job involved writing my training sessions, the more significant part was in helping me develop as a person.  I soon found that I was no longer obsessing over a race that was months in the future, but rather was directing my energy toward what I could do in that moment on that day to be the best that I could be.

Then there was Sara, my sport psychologist, who I also started working with around this time.  Sara introduced me to the principles of mindfulness, which tied in perfectly to my work in becoming process-oriented.  By integrating mindfulness into my life, she helped me become more present in everything I did.  Rather than dwelling on my thoughts, I learned how to accept them for what they were.  Rather than fighting distressful emotions, I learned how to sit with them, embrace the discomfort that came with them, and eventually ride them out.  Over time, I was able to limit the amount of time I spent distracted by my own self-judgements, and instead direct that energy towards being focused on the task at hand (i.e. the process).  And all of that work in tolerating the more difficult emotions produced a pretty awesome side effect: it taught me how to embrace vulnerability and become a more authentic version of myself.

Finally, there were my training partners and friends who reinvigorated my training by showing me that being part of a pack is a lot more fun than being a lone wolf.  They more than anyone helped me find more joy in the process than I ever could have imagined (more on that here).

All of these people played critical roles in helping me embrace the process of preparing for Rio, but at the end of the day, it was on me.  I was the one who had to buy in to this seemingly ridiculous idea that it is the process that drives outcomes.  And I’m not going to lie, it was really hard at first.  When you’re wired to value outcomes over everything else, that shift in mindset takes a lot of work.  But slowly over the course of the year, I started to see the benefits.  After weeks of dedicating myself to the process, this sense of self-trust began to emerge.  I developed this confidence that the decisions I was making were the right ones, and this belief that I had all the tools that I needed to perform.

All of that work culminated in Rio.  For me, the most memorable moment of the entire Rio experience was not crossing the finish line or standing on the podium — it was sitting on the start pontoon in the seconds before my race began.  I remember looking out at the breathtaking mountains in front of me, invigorated by the cheering back at the shore, and just feeling go grateful.  I was appreciative of the opportunity to be there, I was proud of the person that the journey had helped me become, and in that moment, I had never been more happy to race.  My newfound self-trust lent itself to this sense of calmness that I had never experienced before.  While I was ready to race my heart out, I knew deep down that it didn’t matter what happened on the course that day.  I was beginning that race as the best version of myself that I had ever been, and that alone was worth more than any medal.

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That start pontoon

Today, I can confidently say that 2016 was the best year of my life.  The funny thing about that statement is that the “old” Hailey would have looked at the season that I had and said that it was a flop.  I didn’t win a single race.  I placed lower than I ever had in two of my four ITU races.  And if you were really bold, you could say that I fell short of my goal by not getting that gold medal in Rio.  But the Hailey today knows that the results of my races are not the things that matter.  What matters is how I’ve learned to view my worth as more than my resume; how I’ve become more comfortable in my skin than I have ever been; how I’m continuing to become a person that I am truly proud of.

And that, my friends, is a year well-lived.

Why I’m shortening my name

Who the hail is Hailey Danz?

Don’t worry guys, it’s still me.  I am – and always will be – Hailey Danisewicz.  However, I have made the decision to shorten my last name for professional purposes.  I realize that this statement may come as a bit of a surprise, but I am writing this so that I can be completely transparent about how and why I am moving forward with this change.  Contrary to what you’re probably thinking, it’s not because I am trying to emulate my musical idol, Puff Daddy/P. Diddy/Diddy.

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But seriously, does anyone actually know what he’s going by these days?

I was born with the kind of name that nobody knows how to pronounce.  Despite people’s best efforts, my completely unphonetic, Polish last name never really comes out the way it’s supposed to (like in high school when the lady who called kids down to the office would call me Dana-sandwich).  It’s a fact of life that I’ve always been accustomed to, but as my athletic career progressed, it became a growing frustration.  I grew tired of the first question in every media interview being “did I say your name correctly?”  I grew tired of race announcers struggling so much to utter my name that it would take away from the excitement of the moment they were trying to articulate.  I grew tired of the internal battle of wondering if I should correct the presenters who introduced me inaccurately, or let it slide and have my audiences remember me by a false pronunciation.

In these instances, the focus was on how these 10 letters happened to be strung together, when it should have been on the things that I was actually doing.

I had reservations in making the change.  For one thing, I didn’t want to dissociate myself from my family by going by a different surname.  I brought them into the conversation as soon as I started to consider the change, but they understood my reasoning and supported it.  Actually, the decision to go with “Danz” is one that we came to together. “Danz” has always been the nickname that our friends have used for our family, and to this day, it’s what we use to make dinner reservations to avoid excessive spelling over the phone.  Because it was so important to me to keep the integrity of my real name, “Danz” was the natural choice.

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Danz, party of 7

My other hesitation in shortening my name was that it felt sort of self-inflating — like a thing that only super famous people (e.g. Diddy) do, and I know that I’m definitely not super famous.  I mean, I’m the girl who nearly ran away and hid when my regular cashier at Antique Taco told me that he saw me on the news.  Needless to say, getting over this hesitation required a little more work.

People have always told me that being an athlete is partially about your sport and partially about your brand.  But for a long time, I was reluctant to buy in to that logic.  I would get super uncomfortable using phrases like “marketing myself” and “developing my image.”  It felt so pushy and pompous, and I didn’t have the confidence to believe that I deserved to talk about myself in that way.  But my mindset changed when I returned home from Rio.

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I came home inspired by the extent to which other countries have embraced the Paralympic movement — how Paralympic athletes in these countries have become household names, on par with their Olympic counterparts.  I realized that one of the ways we can gain that same traction in the United States is for us to, collectively, promote our Paralympians in the same way that we do our Olympians.  If I wanted to do my part in growing the Paralympic movement, I needed to let go of my issues that were inhibiting my ability to self-promote, and begin to embrace the parts of my job that do not come naturally to me.

I am finally beginning to accept that being a professional athlete is in fact a business.  And the reality is, talking about a business that has a four-syllable name is a lot harder than talking about one with a one-syllable name.  When I viewed it though this lens, the adoption of “Danz” was the savvy thing to do.

And so, from this day forward, I will be going by Hailey Danz.  It may take some getting used to (for both you and me), but I’m ready to embrace this shorter, simpler version and make some room on my tri kit.  Also thinking less letters might just make me a little faster :).

 

I’m Back!

You know when you’ve gone a really long time without seeing a friend who once knew all the details of your life?  You know that you should pick up the phone, but at the same time, there is so much that you need to catch each other up on, that the idea of covering that much information in a single meeting is too staggering.  And so you put it off, and in the meantime accumulate even more life experiences that you’ll have to update said friend on when you eventually meet again.

That’s kind of how I’ve been feeling about updating this blog.  I’ve tried a few times to sit down and write over the last six months, but each time I did, I was overwhelmed by the amount of content I needed to cover.  Not to mention how during the buildup to Rio, I was pretty caught up in my own process, and that process was very much a private affair.  While I found a lot of value in journaling about my process, I was not in a place where I was ready to make those thoughts public.  However, now that I’m a bit more removed from Rio, I’m ready to finally share with you what the journey was like — from the struggle of separating my identity from my sport, to the growth I achieved when I changed my perception of goals; from the anxiety that consumed me in the weeks leading in to the Games, to the quiet confidence that I found when it mattered most; from the pride that I felt walking into the Opening Ceremony, to the exhilaration of standing on the podium.

All of this is to come in the next few blog posts…but what about right now?  I’m sure that a few of you are curious about what life’s been like since Rio and where I’m going next.  So here’s the quick version.

If I’m to be completely honest, the months since the Paralympics have been kind of weird.  When you have one thing that you’ve spent years focusing all your energy on, and then it’s over, it’s hard to figure out how you’re supposed to carry on.  My life pre-Games thrived on focus, direction, structure; but all of that fell apart when the curtain closed on Rio.  The last three months have largely been about picking up the pieces, and figuring out what this next chapter of my life is going to look like.  I don’t have all the answers just yet, but I’m making progress, and that’s all I can ask for right now.

Shortly after Rio, I decided I needed a new goal, which led me to the Houston Marathon.  I’m set to run my third marathon (my first in over two years) on January 15, and have had a ton of fun getting ready for it.  The race have given me some semblance of normalcy by serving as something to work towards, while being different enough from my triathlon training that it feels like a much-needed mental break.

After Houston, I’ll return to triathlon training in preparation for my season opener in March.  I’m still living in Chicago and plan to stay here through the next year, with the exception of a two-month stint in Charlotte this winter.

My current plan is to continue with triathlon for another quad, with the hopes of returning to the Paralympics in Tokyo in 2020.  However, I also know that a lot can change in four years, so I am remaining open to whatever possibilities may come my way between now and then.

The real point of this post, however, is to let you know that I am still here.  And while it may take me a few posts to cover everything I want to say, I am committed to sharing it with all of you who have been so invested in my journey up until this point.  Much like that eventual meeting that you finally have with the long-lost friend, I know I’ll find that the catchup is a lot easier (and more fun) than I built it up to be in my head.  The hardest part is picking up the phone…and it looks like I just completed that step.